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A new year...a new team

About a month ago, I started filling out applications for sponsorships and teams. It can feel tedious and make you question how legitimate you really are. I found myself answering questions directly related to triathlon (i.e. How will you, as well as (insert company here) benefit from this sponsorship?). Other questions, however, make you wonder exactly how your answer will make you more appealing than someone else vying for the same position. For instance, does the super hero I resemble really matter when it comes to how well I'll use my nutritional product?

I'm beginning to think questions pertaining to super heroes, wrestling ring names, and theme music really have nothing to do with my qualification, but more to do with keeping the evaluation team awake. If that's truly the case, I'll divulge my wrestling ring name (I used a random name generator because, let's face it, I'm just not that creative).

Meet Portly Angel.

Ok. So, that didn't exactly float my boat (seeing as though I keep training 10-12 hours a week to resemble anything other than something "portly.") Thankfully, one of my applications hit a note with the evaluators, and I can call myself something far better, far more tasteful instead. I'm not sure what drew their attention to my application. My race results? Volunteer experiences? Pictures?

This 2014, I'll be racing with a team organized by Chris McDonald, the Australian professional best known for his 6 Ironman wins, two of which happened this past summer in a span of just 4 weeks. I'm still working at growing into the name that represents this team. Big Sexy Racing is comprised of two adjectives that have never found themselves in a sentence with my name in it. In the last few weeks, however, those same two adjectives have held me more accountable to my training than my race schedule ever has. Yet when I start reading the race plans of all my teammates, I'll be damned if I'm not trying to add another event somewhere in my race lineup.


I can't wait until we start posting race results. I'm convinced I probably fall in the lower third of this group as far as race performance is concerned. Time will tell, and I hope that with the help of Derek Garcia of Garcia Multisports, I can surmount that dang hill that's kept me from consistently placing on the podium. This year will be different. 


Meet the new Big Sexy. 






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