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Showing posts from 2013

Sub freezing temps? Pull out the yoga pants

I woke up this morning to a text message from my dad, who by 7am, had already been outside for a walk. "Walk was cold, but ok in treed areas. VERY cold in exposed areas." My WeatherChannel app had given Spokane just a measly 3 degrees with 10mph winds. Yet I looked out my window and saw clear skies, which could only mean the sun would be out in likely no more than an hour. For me, the sun is everything. I got out of bed and tried to ignore the fact I had a long run scheduled today. Because my coach had designated this week as a recovery week, my long run wasn't nearly as long as it has been on weekends past. I just had an hour and fifteen minutes. Recovery weeks are tough for me, but today, I felt thankful for a short long run. Maci looked excited. I've decided that weather conditions and temperatures don't phase her. She'd already been outside to pee this morning, but apparently didn't remember how quickly she ran back into the house and darted under

A new year...a new team

About a month ago, I started filling out applications for sponsorships and teams. It can feel tedious and make you question how legitimate you really are. I found myself answering questions directly related to triathlon (i.e. How will you, as well as (insert company here) benefit from this sponsorship?). Other questions, however, make you wonder exactly how your answer will make you more appealing than someone else vying for the same position. For instance, does the super hero I resemble really matter when it comes to how well I'll use my nutritional product? I'm beginning to think questions pertaining to super heroes, wrestling ring names, and theme music really have nothing to do with my qualification, but more to do with keeping the evaluation team awake. If that's truly the case, I'll divulge my wrestling ring name (I used a random name generator because, let's face it, I'm just not that creative). Meet Portly Angel. Ok. So, that didn't exactly float my

The mountain bike...and my pup

During the ride, she never stops (unless mom makes her pose for a picture).  The seed was planted last year around this time, and it took me this long to buy myself a mountain bike. While not brand new and not top of the line, it has served as my alternative to indoor trainer rides so far this fall and hopefully into the coming winter. Maci might be the most excited about this proposal. Usually, I haven't even mounted my bike before her whimpers of excitement escalate into barks of impatience. Before long, she's sprinted down the driveway, knowing I'll have no trouble catching her. To fly as fast as my energetic vizsla. That has most definitely been the highlight so far. I've not yet found my gut to feel fully confident navigating steep downhills, especially when the trail is riddled with rocks and roots. Call me a pansy, but the visions of risking injury keep me well within myself. If I'm not afraid of tipping over sideways and sliding down the embankment, I&

Coeur d' Fundo 2014

A little over a month ago, I remember cruising over Lake CDA in a similar ferry so I could swim back across the lake in the CDA Crossing 2.4 mile swim. That day presented us with beautiful clear, sunny skies, but water that roughened us up a bit. Yesterday, the lake looked unmistakably angry: whitecaps as far as the eye could see. Yet I had no intention of swimming across the lake. Instead, I found out the minute I stepped off the ferry in Harrison that I'd be swimming around the lake--on my bike. Bryan and I had originally intended to ride the Gran fondo of 108 miles, contending for a medal that signified we'd completed more than a ride, but a race against the clock. However, the fact that we'd just come off a long triathlon season, Bryan had just returned from a business trip to Boston with a cold, and the weather was striving to chase everyone back home, we opted to ride the Centro route instead. We figured 47 miles would provide us with enough of a workout to make our

My second attempt at Vegas World Championships 70.3

For the better part of this summer, I tried to capitalize on the heat by doing as much running and cycling as I could in the middle of the day. My coworkers and patients thought it ridiculous when I wandered off out in the 90+ degrees for a run over my lunch break. When my coach encouraged me to do my midweek long/tempo runs in the heat of the day, I started to question myself, too. I remember dreading the end of my long day at work, knowing I had to start home but stop near Mead High School first so I could run. I rode during the hottest parts of the day, too. Having the extra wind against my face certainly helped, but the sun is hard to ignore as it penetrates my skin. All for a decent race in Las Vegas for the World Championships. I swore I would not succumb to and cripple in the heat like I did last year. I hoped my experience would help me find the finish line in a little better shape. This year, I did. Bryan and I arrived on Thursday, which gave me a little more time to pre

Training weekend in Whistler, B.C.

This post comes a few weeks late, but because I'm racing the World Championships 70.3 tomorrow, I figured I better get after this post before it's too late. So, let me tell you about my training weekend in Whistler, BC! After a long day at work on Wednesday, August 21st, Bryan and me continued well into the day and night to arrive up in Whistler, BC at approximately 2:30am Thursday morning. We could only enjoy the scenery up until Penticton, at which point the darkness began to overtake us with about 4 more hours to go. Crossing the border proved somewhat of a minor fiasco. The officer asked us to drive around "back" to have our backgrounds checked. I only had three states to list off of prior residency in the last 18 years. Bryan, on the other hand, couldn't even remember them all. What proved worse is, apparently, another Bryan Rowe exists with a DUI on his driving record. It wasn't until Bryan provided his social security number that the officer let us

I'm on Summer time

Just as I feared, nearly the entire month of August has already passed me by. I sit in Whistler, B.C., which means Ironman Lake Stevens 70.3, the CDA Scenic Challenge Olympic Triathlon, and the CDA Crossing 2.4 mile open water swim have already come and gone. While much has transpired in my racing, an additional boat-load of activity has occurred outside of that arena as well. I've started full- time work as a physical therapist, hired a coach to help guide me through my training endeavors, and continue to train upwards of 12-15 hours a week in preparation for Vegas World Championships. To say I've felt busy is an understatement. I never thought I'd forgo not one but TWO scheduled massages because of a bike ride that ended up falling on the same afternoon. When I finally made the time to visit Melinda at Elements Massage, I literally melted into the table with relief. My muscles felt so completely entangled due to nearly a month without proper attention, that it took ever

Call me Ironman

I wish I could stop and rewind the video of the last 4 days. Truth be told, the excitement in the days that follow an Ironman almost rivals the incredible emotions of the day itself. Perhaps this is why every attempt—up until now—to sit down and organize my thoughts on paper has proven fruitless. Too many thoughts, too many memories struggle for attention in an attempt to claim the spotlight of a day filled with highlights. I look down at my hands and realize I still have them both. Each still exhibits 5 fingers. My feet still work, and every single toe still has its toenail. I remember once hearing that racing an Ironman will shave off about 2 years of your life. I guess after finishing, I thought the loss would be a little more tangible. Sure, my muscles screamed with every step I took. My abdominals seized with every inhalation. My gut rejected all my stomach contents when I got home (I thought I’d be sleeping on the toilet Sunday night). I’m still nursing a blister th

Just 5 more days: Ironman CDA

For those who know me, you'll never find me sitting on my ass doing nothing. I’ve done about all the things a girl could do in the kitchen (dinners are prepared three nights in advance…) I even found myself peeling oranges because I had no other fruit to cut up. My only explanation is that, food that is ready to eat is food more likely to be eaten. I've moseyed around the yard, pulling weeds and tending to the vegetable garden. Since I have nothing left to do, I thought I'd write a little something for you instead. (By the end, you'll likely have suggestions of things I can do).  I still remember 15 days ago when I found comfort in the fact I could still count the number of days to Ironman with my fingers and my toes. It leaves me a little disconcerted that I no longer need my toes or the fingers on my left hand. Only five fingers remain. For the last few days, a number of events have preoccupied my time. I volunteered at the TriFusion Kids Tria

Breathless

When I look back at the past week, I feel as though I need to sit down and hang on to something sturdy. One week ago today, my parents and I flew down to Colorado Springs to watch my brother, Ian, graduate from the Air Force Academy. To say we felt “proud” is an incredible understatement, especially when we thought of all the times we prayed for his success in the face of difficult tests and physical measures. Heck, if he wasn't flying them, he was jumping out of airplanes! Over 1,000 graduates in this year's class. It was pretty overwhelming to watch them all march out onto the field. In the midst of all the pomp and circumstance that surrounded Ian’s graduation, I couldn’t help but feel slightly uncomfortable with leaving the predictable and structured life of Spokane I’ve come to adopt in the face of an impending Ironman that now stands less than 20 days away. Leaving for Colorado during the biggest weak of my training—my peak week—made me wonder if the “balance”

Priest Lake Spring Festival Half Marathon

Results: ATL Timing I found myself gazing out over the clear, translucent water of Priest Lake. My feet moved to the rhythm of my breathing, and if it weren’t for the tangible impact I felt of them hitting asphalt, I never would have known I was running. The cool air smelled fresh, as if no one yet had moved through what the trees and flowering bushes had worked all night to revive. A long time had passed where I have found the opportunity to escape and explore my surroundings with something other than my eyes. Yet I looked ahead. Bryan Rowe didn’t know he ran just 50 yards ahead of me. At the starting line, I had told him to go on ahead, as I had plans to run my slower goal Ironman pace. However, I realized during our 2-mile warm up that my legs had some spunk in them. The only problem was, for the last 3 months, I’ve been walking a fine line between running too much, too soon, too fast and risking further injury to my knee. An out-and-back course on paved

A flip of a coin: St. George 70.3

Sitting on the plane, thinking about what I hoped to do this past weekend at Ironman St. George 70.3, I inevitably thought about everything I had working against me: This race is notorious for terrible weather conditions. The extended forecast predicted a day filled with sunshine, 86 degrees for the high, and mild winds of no more than 4 mph. Yet weather conditions can change in an instant; remember last year’s Boise 70.3? My new Quintana Roo Cdo.1 Race arrived to Fitness Fanatics earlier this week, but because I didn’t have the opportunity to test it out, I decided to forgo the chance to race on a fast, fancy bike. I opted to have Jim put the race wheels on my Seduze instead. Finally, how could I successfully run in a race of such touted difficulty when I haven’t had the chance to run consistently since the last month has required me to rehabilitate my knee? I fully intended to either 1) race the swim and bike legs, and then walk the run, 2) jog the course at a